Lightning Rides and Other Highs: My Poetry Collection

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I have a small collection of my early poetry that has been available online for almost two years, but I have never bothered to promote it.

Not sure why. Perhaps I wasn’t feeling confident or the fact that it’s only an ebook, or that the platform that sells it was new at the time and I didn’t know if they would make it.

Well, it’s time to let my neglected child see the light of day. So here it is.

It’s only $1.50 and features some of the poems on this site and other early works. As long as you have an e-reader that can handle an ePub file, you’ll be good to go.

Click here to grab a “copy.”

Happy Sunday.

Bang.

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Bang.

A hammer to a nail.
A fist to a door.
The finger to a trigger.

Bang.

The guy overheard at the bar.
Sharing his last conquest.
Banged her, he says.

Bravado, ego, the art of bragging.
I’ve little time for this nonsense.
I’m in the corner booth.
A little off. A bit fuzzy.
Busy analyzing what’s wrong with the world
And the people in it.

A BIG BANG.

PLEASE.

One to bookend the first.
The slam of a fucking huge meteor
Somewhere in the South Pacific
Following by a cleansing wash of sea water
Across it all creation
Drowning us and freeing nature of our tyranny.

BANG.

Save me from having to hear another word
From the douchebag
Holding court
Five yards away.

Photo Credit: fpsurgeon via Compfight cc

My Writing Process: A Blog Hop Stop

Blog Hops are these neat little things where different bloggers build bridges between their worlds and hopefully introduce their readers to someone new. There are all kinds of themes for blog hops. This particular one is about the writing process.

Sidney Williams from Sid is Alive passed the baton my way for this leg of the blog hop. Sid is a friend, colleague, and fantastic horror writer and I recommend that you check him out.

Now on to the questions:

What am I working on?

I have several projects under way. For the past six months I have been working on a manuscript for a horror novel (it’s Trainspotting in a haunted house) and a poetry collection with a friend of mine. I’m also doing a fair bit of copywriting and reporting regularly for GenuineOrlando.com.

And…I recently finished a one-month Bizarro writing workshop on Litreactor.com, hosted by one of the pillars of the genre, Rose O’Keefe (publisher of Eraserhead Press). I managed to crank out three short stories and I am putting together a few pitches for potential bizarro novellas.

This is by far the most exciting thing I am currently working on.

How does my work differ from others in its genre?

I’d like to think that it has to do with the referential nature of my writing, along with my talent for satire. My first (and currently only) novel, Leather to the Corinthians, is a bit of a genre mash-up that many found hard to describe. Perhaps that is not the best thing for marketing, but hearing someone say that you just HAVE TO READ IT TO UNDERSTAND IT…that feels great to me.

I have also been told that the book is weird, wild, bizarre, etc. I’ll take that too.

I wrote the book I wanted to write.

Why do I write what I do?

To kind of piggyback on that last thing, I write stories that I would want to read. I have experienced so much STORY in my life, through reading, watching, and playing. I am well read. I know formula, trope, and cliché. I am always looking for something original. I try to do that with my own work and present an original voice.

How does my writing process work?

I write every day, M-F. Sometimes on the weekends, but that’s typically only if there is a paycheck involved.

I need quiet. I need isolation. I am now at the point in my life where I have my own home office and that has made me much more productive. I am more creative when I am tired or after exercise, so I try to time my sessions to line up with these.

I can write at any time in the day, but until I do, I feel like I left something on the stove.

Or the water running.

Or that I am being crushed by 1000 pounds of dreams and expectations.

Also, I will listen to music that reinforces the mood of what I am writing. Many of my characters have soundtracks or playlists that help me stay true.

Who’s next on the Blog Hop?

I have chosen two wonderful writers for you.

Dominic and I have been friends since I started blogging. We met through WordPress. I love his stuff. He’s so damn authentic. You can find him here – eternalDomnation.com

Linda is a writer and folk artist, and she is amazing at both. Her blog is relatively new and each post is so very well crafted. Find her at: Lindapuritz.wordpress.com

Greetings and Salutations

Hi All,

If you’re stopping by courtesy of the Writing Process blog hop or you stumbled upon my blog because you clicked on the wrong link…

Welcome to my little slice of the virtual world. Take a look around. Do some clicky-clicky. Perhaps investigate the Table of Contents. I might have something that interests you.

In a few days, I’ll be adding my stone to the hop and plugging you in to some other great blogs. I hope you’ll revisit to see who I have in store for you.

And hey, if you’re feeling frisky — why not follow my blog? I’m good for a thoughtful post or two and I am not spammy in the least.

Cheers and Happy Friday.

Tom

Amnesia

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There’s an aspect to amnesia
That I find quite attractive
A forced blank slate
The loss of so many regrets
Haunting mistakes
Poorly chosen words
Many people won’t forgive you
Because they know that you know
What happened that day
They want their justice
But if you don’t know
If you just simply don’t have
The recollection

It wasn’t you.

So there is no one to blame
They must forgive you
That you no longer exists
An alluring opportunity
The bitch of it, the tradeoff
Would be kissing goodbye
All of the things that went right
Pretty little picture postcards
Torn to shreds

The new replacing the You that you knew.

To be truly reborn at an older age
To experience everything for the first time
A loss of irony and cynicism
That’s attractive to me
Because I judge far too often
I’ve been carrying these bags for years
I’m exhausted and
I have no idea
How to shake the memories
That follow me.
Photo Credit: Jon Chevier™ via Compfight cc

books

Family History

It’s my understanding that
I have one hell of a family history
That’s not too difficult to believe
Probably true for most.

From all over Europe
Viking North
Mediterranian South
And many stops in between.

There’s been much love
Conducted across the water
and that love trickled down
from Duke to Lord to whatnot.

There’s a Von in there somewhere
And someone who worked
For the Hapsburgs
And some other sketchy types as well.

I once asked
If we’re descended from such greats
WHERE THE HELL IS THE MONEY?
Have you heard of the Great Depression?

My father loved to regale
Such histories and myths
Your grand so-and-so knew Jesus!
Now that’s hyperbole.

The Greek line has been
The most frustrating
From Sparta, I was told
Fierce. Warrior. Blood.

Oh, how I loved that
A cult of manly men
Brutal with sword and spear
I could almost feel the DNA.

That little chestnut
Kept me going for years.
No matter the beast
I could slay it. Spartan.

Then I learned
It wasn’t Sparta but
Crete called home.
Asterion, my brother.

Not nearly as much
Fun a boast
But there’s that labyrinth
And the bullhead.

As are most things
Less impressive and shiny when
Scrubbed down by truth
But useful nevertheless.

If you are ever lost
Keep making right turns
Eventually you’ll find
The way out of the maze.

I learned that in Crete.

Book Review: The Remnant: Into the Collision by P.A. Douglas

The Remnant: Into the CollisionThe Remnant: Into the Collision by P.A. Douglas

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I’ve known for a long time that the apocalypse is not something to fear. It’s what people will do while the sky falls that is much more frightening. I’ve survived a few mini-pocalypses: a devastating tornado, several hurricanes, and two redheads. I have seen first hand just how batshit crazy people get when the status quo gets a healthy shake. They’ll stab you in the throat for a gallon of gasoline.

P.A. Douglas presents a relatively plausible game-over scenario: Earth finds itself in the crosshairs of a killer field of asteroids and the ensuing meteor storm not only rains down on the planet, but one big old rock gives the moon a kiss and bumps it out of orbit. The result is massive flooding, earthquakes, and something unexpected – the reduction of oxygen in our atmosphere. The air is escaping the balloon, and it seems inevitable that all life on the planet will eventually be extinguished. The time waiting for the ticket punch will be excruciating for those who have managed to survive.

We meet Byron, our protagonist, just pre-apocalypse. He’s an average guy. He’s got an ex-wife and kid living out of state and spends his days grinding away at work and watching cartoons. He’s been hiding out in his apartment watching the events unfold and he is confused and scared. However, he doesn’t get to stay there for long and eventually finds himself with a reasonably sane and diverse group of folks. As the book progresses, we watch them logically plan out their survival while dealing with the personality conflicts one would expect in such dire circumstances.

Douglas contrasts Bryon’s group with another, a group of National Guardsmen who have taken the plunge and allowed themselves to devolve into violent beasts driven by urges to rape and pillage. It’s within this contrast that Douglas puts human nature to the test. Do we rise to the occasion or sink to the bottom when faced with the ultimate crisis? Do we share that gasoline or do we stab someone for it? When the end comes, will you have grace? Or will it be disgrace?

The narrative is tight. We stick to a small cast of characters and although the outside world and its disintegration are mentioned, it’s really about what’s happening in the immediate vicinity. The story is character driven and although the setting is driving their motivations, it never determines them. Byron’s a sympathetic aspiring hero, one that we can behind. There’s some ugly in this book but Byron keeps hope alive.

A great weekend read and a solid contribution to the genre. Worth picking up.

View all my reviews

Creative Writing – Poetry – Short Pieces – News – By Tom Lucas

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